Why don’t archivists digitize everything?

Fascinating. Inspiring and daunting.

Archives @ PAMA

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Today on the blog we’re tackling one of our most frequently asked questions: “Why don’t you digitize everything?” and its related runner-up, “When will you be putting all your records on the web?”

As archivists we like these questions because they tell us that people are eager for access to archival records. They also show that people realize that not everything is digitized. Indeed only a tiny fraction of the world’s primary resources are available digitally. This doesn’t mean that undigitized records are inaccessible or not worth consulting, but you will need to visit us archivists to use them.

In fact, archivists and librarians themselves are behind the abundance of primary sources already available on the internet. From rare books to official records and from diaries to sound recordings, digitized resources have spread the word (literally) that the past informs our present and our future. In the meantime, both non-profit and commercial organizations whose…

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Embedding is the new linking

Online Journalism Blog

Twitter is 59% of all embeds, YouTube 26%, Instagram 14% and Facebook 1% Image: The State of Social Embeds

Every web journalist knows that linking is one of the most fundamental qualities of online journalism: a web article without links is like TV without moving images.

But in the last couple of years something else has become equally important: I’m talking about the embed.

Two years ago I noted how publishers were finally getting to grips with linking – and how embedding was a major factor in that.

As material from social media has become increasingly central to news stories, content management systems have finally been adapted to allow journalists to embed the very elements they were talking about: that controversial tweet; the Facebook reaction; the damning Instagram snap; the viral YouTube video.

Now, one report has noted that almost a quarter of 1 million news articles in a study included embedded media.

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Create a document to plan your social posts

Joy Mayer

UPDATED 10/5/16: Scroll down for a sample social media plan from Colorado Public Radio.

In a Poynter class I’m teaching, we’ve been talking about the need to be strategic about how we produce our social channels.

It’s not enough to react to today’s news. We need to think about the mix of content. We need to share what we know people are talking about today, not just what our newsrooms feel like producing today. We need to share certain stories at certain times.

We need to think about what we published yesterday, last week or six months ago that might have new relevance today, and come up with a system to plan ahead for those posts.

Some of us also have lots of people jumping in and out of social posting in our newsrooms. It can be tough to know who’s in charge of which stories, which hours and which…

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Good luck Chris Woodka — no one can replace your work on the water beat

Coyote Gulch

Chris Woodka photo via The High Country News Chris Woodka photo via The High Country News

FromThe Pueblo Chieftain:

Chris Woodka, a longtime editor and reporter at The Pueblo Chieftain, recently accepted the position of issues management program coordinator for the Southeastern Colorado Water Conservancy District, effective Sept. 12. He will work with the district and Bureau of Reclamation on the Arkansas Valley Conduit and other projects.

Woodka, 61, has worked at The Chieftain since 1985. For the past 12 years, he has been on special assignment as a water reporter, as well as filling various relief roles for other editors and reporters. Over the years, he has received numerous awards from newspaper associations and various community groups.

Woodka will continue to write Monday Morning Special, which appears weekly in The Chieftain’s Life section.

Click here to read the Coyote Gulch post about Chris from Matt Jenkins writing in The High Country News: From the…

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Pueblo’s Pokemon potential

As the Pokemon Go phenomenon catches fire across the globe, Pueblo is not immune to its charms. Businesses all over are trying to capitalize on the fact that they’s suddenly become PokeStops and Pokemon Gyms. A few spots around town are emerging as Pokemon points of interest.

BINGO!

Pueblo’s Bingo Burger is near a PokeStop (a place where Pokemon Go players can replenish their supplies of items like Potions and the all-important PokeBalls used to catch virtual critters). But Bingo Burger isn’t just hoping that passing players will become patrons after using the PokeStop — they’re actually offering a 10% discount off your meal if you show them your Pokemon (something I wish I’d known before I bought yesterday’s lunch).

THE WILD …

The Pueblo Zoo is getting in on the act, too, posting a few screenshots of the augmented-reality game’s virtual Pokemon creatures mingling with the mooses, African painted dogs, owls and North American river otters on their Facebook page — and adding that non-member visitors can show the cashier that they have the Pokemon Go app on their phones to get $1 off the price of admission.

But, wait — there’s more! The paperboy statue right in front of The Pueblo Chieftain office at 825 W. Sixth St. is a PokeStop, too — so you can conveniently resupply whenever you have business here.